« Review: Crochet Hooks & Lion Brand Baby Wool | Home | VIDEO - Kristl discusses Koshibo printed fabrics »

Fixing Increase Mistakes

April 11, 2011

There is always some point in a knitting pattern that I have realized that I'm missing a stitch from a row below. Usually this is with a substantial pattern will 300 or so sts per row (Murphy's Law and all). Not a piece you relish un-knitting, going back finding/fixing the problem and knitting again. Once you have figured out where the problem is it can be easy to fix an increase or add an increase without a lot of frogging and reknitting. Some increases are easier to fix than others.

YO.jpg

YO (Yarn over)- this is an open increase that creates an eyelet. To fix a yarn over you just need to pick up the ladder between 2 stitches and put it on your left needle and knit it. Depending on how many rows down you need you increase to be you pick up the ladder from that row put it on your crochet hook (or 3rd needle, if you like) and fix your stitches back up the correct row.

M1.jpg

M1 (Make one)- this is a relatively invisible increase. To add or fix a M1 increase you will pick up the ladder from the desired row just like a YO but you will then twist the loop and the place it on your fixing tool and work back up to your working row.


Kf&b (Knit front & back)- this creates a bar or a purl like stitch that adds a decorative or textural detail good for sleeve increases. Fixing a Kf&b can be tricky but with my video tutorial you will have it down in no time!

kf&b.jpg

I would recommend practicing on a swatch first before attempting on your knitted piece. A good ball of cotton yarn (very easy to rip and knit) and your favorite needles is all you need. Good Luck

 

No TrackBacks

TrackBack URL: https://blog.fabric.com/cgi-bin/mt5/mt-tb.cgi/4355

Leave a comment

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by published on April 11, 2011 4:07 PM.

Review: Crochet Hooks & Lion Brand Baby Wool was the previous entry in this blog.

VIDEO - Kristl discusses Koshibo printed fabrics is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.