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The Fabric Maverick says... Let me give you some tips for working with oil cloth and cotton laminates

June 10, 2008

Oil Cloth and cotton laminates are fun to work with once you have a few tips to make it easier. Oil cloth and cotton laminates are different. Oil cloth is 100% vinyl which has been screen printed and can have a cotton mesh or flannel backing.  Cotton laminate is 100% cotton which has been heat bonded to a laminate or vinyl base. These fabrics have several common denominators:

1. Not machine washable

2. Cannot fold -should be rolled

3. Require special sewing methods

Do's

1. Use a Teflon presser foot or masking tape when sewing. If you are using masking tape, apply it to the presser foot. If you place on the fabric, the residue will be hard to remove.

2. Use binder clips or tape to hold fabric in position. If you pin it, make sure it is within the seam allowance. Otherwise the holes will show on the finished side.

3. If using an interfacing, you might want to use a temporary spray adhesive to hold the fabric and interfacing together. I have used this method and found it works really well. You can also reposition the fabric on the interfacing easily. It does not gum up your needle.  I used NR-369 with great success.

4. Use a size 16 needle if sewing 2 pieces of oil cloth together. If you are working with cotton laminate, you may use a size 14 or less.

5. You may use a regular cotton/polyester thread in most applications.

6. Fabri-tac is a good adhesive for most projects.

Don'ts:

1. Sew one time- if you have to remove stitches they will show

2. Do not use pins 

3. Do not fold

4. Do not apply heat or iron.

5. Do not put in the washing machine- wipe clean with a sponge and mild detergent

If your fabric is wrinkled or is showing a fold mark, lay out in the sun or warm room.  Give the fabric the chance to remove the wrinkles. Fabric.com mails all of these types of fabrics on a roll to minimize that problem.

These fabrics are waterproof, but where you create seams are not. If you wish to have a completely waterproof product, you will need to apply a seam sealant.

Finishing raw edges:

Since this fabric does not ravel, nothing needs to be done. If you want a more finished look, you can use double sided bias tape or sew a hem.  Sewing a hen will be easier with cotton laminate than oil cloth.

Look out for Thursday- Kristl is back with a great sew or no-sew project for oil cloth.

 

 

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12 Comments

What does the masking tape do? I am getting ready to use the laminated fabric for the first time and got lucky to find thid blog!

I've sewn on the laminated cotton. A teflon coated pressure foot makes sewing these vinyl-y fabrics a breeze. The masking tape is a substitute for the teflon coated pressure foot in that it allows the pressure foot to glide as well. These fabrics have SO many applications. They're great. Enjoy!

I am looking for fabric to reupholster some retro kitchen chairs. I love the laminated cotton designs on this website, but am wondering if it is durable enough for upholstery on kitchen chairs. Any advice?

I have never sewn with laminated cotton and it sounds rather daunting. I want to make placemats and I want them 2 thicknesses but how do I finish the edges neatly? If I bind with bias binding how would you keep it clean? Anybody done this before? fishbatigma

This is for Debbie Shanks:

I really dislike correcting people, but sometimes, it is necessary.
The part of the sewing machine of which you speak (for placing masking tape) is a "presser foot" not a "pressure foot."

This is very interesting - thanks for a good read!!!

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I normally do not comment on postings but after reading yours I wanted to just write a short message. Thanks for the information on setup I found it filled with great information thanks keep up the good posting.

I cannot see your site properly on my iPhone (I have the 3G, not 3GS). Anyway, I have put your RSS into my laptop, so thanks!

This was novel. I wished I could read every post, but i have to go back to work now... But I'll return.

I use cotton laminate for aprons and it's easy to work with if you plan carefully. I use a leather needle and a walking foot, hair clips instead of pins (unless you can pin within the seam allowance), and cut with a rotary cutter. I have machine washed (GENTLE cycle) my aprons multiple times and iron on the BACK side with a warm (no steam) iron. They wear well and can be wiped off rather than washed also. Not sure about wear potential for seat covers but they're great for placemats and tablecloths, shopping bags, purses, etc. Great fabric to work with!

I use cotton laminate for aprons and it's easy to work with if you plan carefully. I use a leather needle and a walking foot, hair clips instead of pins (unless you can pin within the seam allowance), and cut with a rotary cutter. I have machine washed (GENTLE cycle) my aprons multiple times and iron on the BACK side with a warm (no steam) iron. They wear well and can be wiped off rather than washed also. Not sure about wear potential for seat covers but they're great for placemats and tablecloths, shopping bags, purses, etc. Great fabric to work with!

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This page contains a single entry by published on June 10, 2008 10:00 AM.

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